Foundry is a province-wide network of integrated health and social service centres for young people ages 12-24. Foundry centres provide a one-stop-shop for young people to access mental health care, substance use services, primary care, social services and youth and family peer supports.

We provide safe, non-judgmental care, information and resources, and work to reach young people earlier – before health challenges become problematic. Foundry brings health and social services together in a single place to make it easier for young people to find the care, connection and support they need.

We believe young people should have a voice in their care and that finding the right support shouldn’t be difficult.

Foundry also represents community agencies, government, donors, youth and young adults, and families coming together to improve the wellness of BC’s young people.

Our network is made up of community-based health and social service centres and online tools and resources for young people ages 12-24 and their families. Foundry has engaged over 140 partners across the province of BC. The Foundry central office, hosted by Providence Health Care, leads the provincial initiative and supports the development of local centres. Each Foundry centre is operated by a lead agency that brings together local partners, service providers, young people and caregivers. Foundry’s online platform, foundrybc.ca, is powered by BC Children’s Hospital.

We provide safe, non-judgmental care, information and resources, and work to reach young people earlier – before health challenges become problematic. Foundry brings health and social services together in a single place to make it easier for young people to find the care, connection and support they need.

We are committed to working with our partners to change lives, communities and our systems, because young people are our future.

Foundry is a new approach to wellness services for young people.

Land acknowledgment

At Foundry BC, our provincial work extends across lands that are built on a complex history of colonization. These lands are home to many First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples today. Indigenous people’s histories, knowledges and ways of being are diverse and unique to every community Foundry has a presence in.

We recognize and respect Coast Salish Peoples as traditional stewards of the stolen, occupied, and ancestral lands of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil-waututh), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), S’ólh Téméxw (Stó:lō), Stz’uminus Nations and the Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group that our central office is located on*. 

As a settler organization, it is our responsibility to call out and dismantle colonialism in the work that we do and reflect on how we continue to contribute and benefit from the genocidal displacement of First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples. 

We are working respectfully to hold and nurture relationships with Indigenous Peoples, including Indigenous youth and family advisors, staff, lead agencies and partners, who lead, guide and inform our work.

To learn more, read the In Plain Sight report and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada’s Call to Action report. 

*Foundry Central Office is located in Vancouver, BC. For this reason, we acknowledge the lands of the Coast Salish Peoples. For a comprehensive list of all the traditional territories that our centres are located on, see the map below or visit this link: 

Photo credit: First Peoples’ Cultural Council

 

Our Successes

We are happy to share with you some of our successes.

Learn how we’re doing things differently.

Our Approach

 

If I had a choice I wouldn't have to repeat my traumas multiple times to get the help I need.

- Young person speaking to the challenges of having to retell their story

We need to get ahead of the problem, ahead of the crisis. So we provide services to the younger population, when they tend to be less crisis-driven.

- Dr. Steve Mathias, Foundry Executive Director

Preventively-oriented interventions targeted to young people aged 12-24 have the capacity to generate greater personal, social and economic benefits than intervention at any time in the lifespan.

- The Economic Impact of Youth Mental Illness and the Cost Effectiveness of Early Intervention (2009). Access Economics Limited, Australia
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Find information on Foundry's network of wellness centres being created across British Columbia.

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